Hollywood Charm

Embrace old Hollywood style in this apron inspired by 1940 style.
This apron features a body made from 100% Japanese silk with an original pink bamboo pattern.

 

“This is the most original apron of this style that you will find anywhere. The heart shaped body is simply sweet, and is given a daring sexy accent with black French lace. Silky bottoms? Yes please! This apron/costume finishes to smooth and is lovely to wear.

Visit etsy.com to see the listing [here].

Dressmaking Revisited

I reealllyyyyy wanted a new form fitting dress made from winter jersey material, but I did not want to spend a lot of $$$.

I found a sale (hooray!), and purchased 1.5 Meters of Heather Grey winter jersey material for about  $30 CDN. 

The end result?



I used a cut out technique to create lines that contoured my body shape. This custom made design is extremely form fitting as a result. 

Working with this fabric was tricky because of the intense 4 way stretch. I had to take extra care to triple stitch the seams to avoid embarrassing splits.


The back is secured by a black zipper. 

The lines minimize bulging areas 🙂 


Thanks for reading,

Sunflower TOO abstract acrylic

I don’t love this piece (speaking honestly).

although  I had very reasonable intentions, it did not turn out as I had expected.

I am a harsh and rigid critic of my own work.

I think that it is important to appreciate your good and bad pieces as an artist. It is a part of any journey to becoming something: learning from your mistakes and planning out what to do better next time.

It will be a great feeling to cover up some of these with gesso.

thanks for stopping by,

-S

 

$$Save Money$$ Make your own stretched canvas frames

As an artist, one always needs to conserve money and resources.

It totally goes without saying that artist canvas is one of the most expensive items you buy. Each piece requires at least one canvas: there is no way around that!

Once you start getting into you 40th and 50th piece, you can really start feeling the pinch!

Here is my quick guide to making your own stretched art canvas frames for a fraction of the cost of buying it at an art supply store.

Own Art Canvas Ad


Materials

  • Staple gun
  • 12 mm stainless steel staples
  • 8 foot lengths of 2″ x 2″ wood (quantity depends on size of frames you wish to make)
  • Miter saw (or miter box and hand saw)
  • Wood glue

Decide on the side of canvas frame you want to have. Keep in mind that the larger your frame, the more supports you will need; so try a small frame (no larger than 2 feet x 2 feet) for your first time.

3
Measuring your wood

Measure the lengths of your required pieces from your 8 foot lengths of wood.

1
8 Foot lengths laid on garage floor

Tips
Before you cut your wood, check for significant “bows” or crooked parts.Any inconsistently straight parts will make your frame crooked.

Also avoid cutting where the wood has “knots”. Your saw will have a tougher time cutting through knots in wood.

6
Miter Saw cutting at marked and measured point on wood

Cut your wood smoothly and carefully. Always wear goggles, and something to cover your nose and mouth from wood dust.

8
Measure twice and cut once! Always mark where you need to cut on your wood with an easily visible pencil or pen.

Clear away any mess and start laying out your structure on the floor or your work area.

11
Arrange your structure to align at 90 degree angles on the floor

Lay out your entire structure to ensure that you have measured and cut all proper lengths, and have no missing pieces.

10
Align your pieces to meet at 90 degrees

Using wood glue, slather your corners and join them to fit at 90 degrees. The size and thickness of the 2″ x 2″ wood make it easy to have well formed corners, but I recommend confirming the 90 degree angle with a carpenters square.

13
Use enough glue! When you put your corners together, glue should squeeze out from all sides.

For this frame, I cut small triangle supports to reinforce the structure and prevent bending. I also used glue to secure these supports at each corner.

14
Staple Time! Use lots of 12 mm staples to secure each corner.

Using 12mm stainless steel staples, secure each corner.

There is no set rule of how many staples to use, but since the 12 mm staples are very long and get driven deeply into the wood, I would say that it is safe to use 3- 4 staples for each corner.

15
Ready to start drying!

Let your new frame dry from 3-6 hours, however I would recommend letting the glue dry overnight.

Once you have let the frame dry, you can stand it up to save space.

Here are some variations I have made in the past.

Note that these have cotton canvas stretched over and stapled in place. I will post a tutorial on this DIY project soon.

Tips

If you have any staples that didn’t get driven in all the way, simply use a hammer or mallet to drive them all the way in.
For really large frames, remember to put in cross bars, as well as long wood screws to secure pieces longer than 5 feet.

 

Thanks for stopping by,

-S

Heaven’s Gate- Acrylic on Canvas Art

gold, blue, green acrylic on canvas
Heaven’s Gate – 2016-12 x 6 inches

 

I wanted to feature this piece specifically because it incorporates lots of gold. I like it so much that I gave it a name;(something I have not made a habit of thus far). It is entitled “Heaven’s gate” as this was the first term that came to my mind when it was completed.

I used gold leaf, green and blue acrylic on this 12 x 6 inch canvas. The only qualm I have with this work is that it isn’t as large as it deserves to be (in my opinion). There is some limited relief and texture in this piece, and the blending is quite well executed.

I have not sold this piece yet, but even if it doesn’t sell I am happy to have it hand on my wall for as long as I am able to.

Thanks for stopping by,

-S

Tips for creating a home photo studio

When I started my Etsy shop two years ago, there were a lot of things I had to do that were totally outside of my comfort zone. One of those things (a huge and important thing) was to learn how to take good and clear photographs. When selling handmade items, one piece of advice that is repeated as gospel is to take clear images in great lighting; that tell a story about the product; and that show off as many details about texture and colour as can be in a high resolution format.

That is a geeky way of saying that you really gotta learn how to make someone buy your product all through sight! Of course there are other factors that help people decide to buy your handmade item, but that’s a topic in a blog post for another day 😉

First thing: employ the ownership of a 3 light lamp on a sturdy stand. 3 lights are best not because of aesthetic, but because they can be moved and aimed to point at your handmade object in a way that enough light hits it. Think: laser beams!

lamp
A three light lamp on a vertical stand- you can pick one of these up at Home Depot, Lowes, Home Hardware, or whatevs.

Below we see a photo stage set with a mannequin. In order to get a smooth and uniform backdrop, I hanged a white poly material from the wall. This backdrop is really best when either totally white (or as close as you can get) because the light shined from your lamp needs to be “bounced back” at the camera to ensure a well illuminated photo.

Easy trick to help remember: Optics= studying how light is captured and refracted to enhance/change images. I’m sure there is a more scholarly explanation that that of course; but that’s a basic grade 8 review 🙂

ex3
Notice the two lamps above and below – my camera is set up between the two: peeking through stand’s branches

Once the stage is set and the light hits all of the areas that you want to highlight, take a few test pictures to see whether you should use flash (or not); set a widescreen image; or fiddle around with any camera settings that you like to use.

ex4
Green Hemp apron with green frills- a feminine design by LillyBoChic

Final product: a cropped image with the brightness and contrast increased slightly.

IMG_0018
Green Hemp apron with green frills- a feminine design by LillyBoChic

For a non-professional photograph, I think it captures all of the elements that I had hoped for. I really like how crisp and clear the photo is- you can see the blue chalk lines on the garment (a temporary marking of course) that I used to line up each pocket.

That’s all for now, thanks for stopping by.

-S

Comissioned work- an apron named “Cheffrey”

cheffrey apron
An apron named Cheffrey

This was an experimental design for an apron to say the least. It was commissioned for a man, so I immediately decided that the shape and function needed to be masculine. Inspired by male characters from video games, I created a slouchy side apron with a diagonal flap. The flap covers three pockets that are hidden, providing full functionality. I hope the clients like this piece, as I think it truly showcases LillyBoChic originality.IMG_3205