The Black Widow

This Christian Louboutin inspired apron is both sexy and traditional at once.

 

“Plush black material is lined by smooth crimson to create a peekaboo styled apron. On one side it is a black apron; on the other it you a glimpse of a daring red lining. Very innocuous, and very sexy.”

White cotton frills line the top and bottom to finish this apron off with a traditional French Maid style.

Visit the listing at etsy.com by clicking [here].

 

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Hollywood Charm

Embrace old Hollywood style in this apron inspired by 1940 style.
This apron features a body made from 100% Japanese silk with an original pink bamboo pattern.

 

“This is the most original apron of this style that you will find anywhere. The heart shaped body is simply sweet, and is given a daring sexy accent with black French lace. Silky bottoms? Yes please! This apron/costume finishes to smooth and is lovely to wear.

Visit etsy.com to see the listing [here].

Aprons to Costumes…then Lingere? 

New apron design

AUTUMN 

Autumn is always a special time of year for me. I enjoy the mild temperatures, the promise of exciting news from the previous season’s adventures, and of course delicious hot drinks. 

I’ve started designing costumes again, and I’m branching out into more diverse and experimental patterns. I am definitely considering fashion illustrations (in my shaky hand) to accompany my costumes. 

I think there is something to be said about the conceptualization  of a design before it’s full actualization. When something is fully thought out and consideration is given to small details, it is pretty obvious in the finished product. 

It’s a positive thing, believe me. 

Thanks for stopping by, 

S.

Tips for creating a home photo studio

When I started my Etsy shop two years ago, there were a lot of things I had to do that were totally outside of my comfort zone. One of those things (a huge and important thing) was to learn how to take good and clear photographs. When selling handmade items, one piece of advice that is repeated as gospel is to take clear images in great lighting; that tell a story about the product; and that show off as many details about texture and colour as can be in a high resolution format.

That is a geeky way of saying that you really gotta learn how to make someone buy your product all through sight! Of course there are other factors that help people decide to buy your handmade item, but that’s a topic in a blog post for another day 😉

First thing: employ the ownership of a 3 light lamp on a sturdy stand. 3 lights are best not because of aesthetic, but because they can be moved and aimed to point at your handmade object in a way that enough light hits it. Think: laser beams!

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A three light lamp on a vertical stand- you can pick one of these up at Home Depot, Lowes, Home Hardware, or whatevs.

Below we see a photo stage set with a mannequin. In order to get a smooth and uniform backdrop, I hanged a white poly material from the wall. This backdrop is really best when either totally white (or as close as you can get) because the light shined from your lamp needs to be “bounced back” at the camera to ensure a well illuminated photo.

Easy trick to help remember: Optics= studying how light is captured and refracted to enhance/change images. I’m sure there is a more scholarly explanation that that of course; but that’s a basic grade 8 review 🙂

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Notice the two lamps above and below – my camera is set up between the two: peeking through stand’s branches

Once the stage is set and the light hits all of the areas that you want to highlight, take a few test pictures to see whether you should use flash (or not); set a widescreen image; or fiddle around with any camera settings that you like to use.

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Green Hemp apron with green frills- a feminine design by LillyBoChic

Final product: a cropped image with the brightness and contrast increased slightly.

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Green Hemp apron with green frills- a feminine design by LillyBoChic

For a non-professional photograph, I think it captures all of the elements that I had hoped for. I really like how crisp and clear the photo is- you can see the blue chalk lines on the garment (a temporary marking of course) that I used to line up each pocket.

That’s all for now, thanks for stopping by.

-S

Just Sewed: Apron inspired by Dorothy from Wizard of Oz

A recent apron design I came up with over the holiday break is the “Dorothy”.

Dorothy Apron- A Blue Gingham-frilled border on a sheer hemp bodice. Finished with a white satin ribbon
Dorothy Apron- A Blue Gingham-frilled border on a sheer hemp bodice. Finished with a white satin ribbon

The name is due to the blue gingham frills that border the all natural hemp bodice of the apron; and their likeness to the blue gingham that the character Dorothy wore in the Wizard of Oz (film adaptation starring Judy Garland).

Dorothy Apron- A Blue Gingham-frilled border on a sheer hemp bodice. Finished with a white satin ribbon
Dorothy Apron- A Blue Gingham-frilled border on a sheer hemp bodice. Finished with a white satin ribbon

What I like the most about this piece is that there is evidence of an emerging style in the LillyBoChic line. Admirers of my designs will notice that feminine bodice shapes will often have frills or colors suggesting softness. I think that it is very necessary to allow people who identify with femininity and cherish it, to have plenty of opportunities to immerse themselves within its examples.

Therefore: flirty aprons are a must!

That being said; I also think that femininity has a hard edge- something that tells the world that we (feminine types) are willing to get out hands dirty to get the job done. What is so dirty, you might ask? Well, I suppose that is left to the imagination of the wearer and the audience.

Thanks for stopping by.

-S

Creating an apron with vintage material

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Vintage fabric imported from Japan- Over the shoulder apron

The Japanese version of Batik dye is seen here in with this vintage fabric imported for LillyBoChic. It is unique, colorful, and breathes life into a medium I have made the foundation of my design line: the apron. One may ask: how many different ways can you make an apron?

I may answer: as many ways as you can wear one. (Probably a very high number)

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Over the shoulder apron

 

This design is inspired by the classic over-the-shoulder style of apron. The pull-over design sits atop the shoulders of the wearer, with adjustable ties at the waist to accommodate various sizes. I included a front pocket (something I have been doing a lot of lately, out of a concern that my designs were lacking utility).

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Pocket view of vintage fabric imported from Japan

Since I am accustomed to free-hand drafting many aspects of my designs, I tailored the chest area/collar of this apron to allow for a better fit. Tailoring also achieved a bell curve on the shape of the apron bottom, creating a frill/ looseness that adds a soft femininity. I’m pleased with how this turned out as I was contemplative of what type of apron design could be qualified to accommodate such a high-drama pattern.

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Back side of Apron- Over the shoulder, ties at waist.

 

That’s all for now, and thanks for stopping by,

-S